Wetland wonders

The critters that make their homes in wetlands are some of the neatest (and cutest!) creatures I have ever encountered. Below are some pictures and biographies of these beauties.

 

Pacific Chorus Frog, also known as the Pacific Tree Frog (Pseudacris regilla).

Pacific Chorus Frog, also known as the Pacific Tree Frog (Pseudacris regilla).

This is a Northern Red-legged frog (Rana aurora).

Northern Red-legged frog (Rana aurora).

Green frog (Lithobates clamitans).

Green frog (Lithobates clamitans).

Green frog tadpole. These frogs stay as tadpoles for two years before metamorphosing into frogs.

Green frog tadpole. These frogs stay as tadpoles for two years before metamorphosing into frogs.

Crayfish! He wasn't too happy about being held.

Crayfish! He wasn’t too happy about being held.

 

Juvenile Western Toad (Anaxyrus boreas).

Juvenile Western Toad (Anaxyrus boreas).

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Rough Skinned Newt (Taricha granulosa)

This is a Caddisfly, which is in the order trichoptera.  These insects create little cases for themselves. Depending on their habitat, these cases can be made of vegetation or rocks. To me, she looks like she's just hiding away in her sleeping bag.

This is a Caddisfly (order: trichoptera). These insects create little cases for themselves. Depending on their habitat, these cases can be made of vegetation or rocks. To me, she looks like she’s just hiding away in her sleeping bag.

Northwestern Salamander (Ambystoma gracile).

Northwestern Salamander (Ambystoma gracile).

Northwester salamander egg mass. See how is laid around a piece of grass? That's one way you can tell its a Northwestern Salamander. It feels a lot like holding a squishy, wiggily softball.

Northwester salamander egg mass. See how is laid around a piece of vegetation? That’s one way you can tell its from a Northwestern Salamander. It feels a lot like holding a squishy, wiggily softball.

This is a common garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis).

Common garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis). Snakes use their forked tongue to smell which helps them with navigation.

Can you guess who this is? He's a Spotty (Oregon Spotted Frog) and if you look in the background to the right, you can see an Oregon Spotted Frog egg mass.

Can you guess who this is?                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             He’s a Spotty! (Oregon Spotted Frog) and if you look in the background to the right, you can see an Oregon Spotted Frog egg mass.

Oregon Spotted Frog egg masses. These frogs are communal breeders, which means that they like to lay their eggs all together in the same place. This was a picture I took early in the breeding season. Can you count all 4 egg masses? These communal breeding sites can easily add up to over 50 by the end of the season.

Oregon Spotted Frog egg masses. These frogs are communal breeders, which means that they like to lay their eggs all together in the same place. This was a picture I took early in the breeding season. Can you count all 4 egg masses? These communal breeding sites can add up to 30+ by the end of the season.

 

 

 

 

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